All Saints & St Barnabas

Services

Holy Spe

 

Within the table below:

STB is shorthand for St Barnabas

ASK is shorthand for All Saints

 

 

 1st      Sunday of the month

 

2nd Sunday of the month

3rd Sunday of the month

4th Sunday of the month

5th Sunday of the month

STB

8am Eucharist

 

8am Eucharist

 

8am will be at the Church that doesn’t have the Joint service. 

ASK

 

8am  Eucharist

 

8am Eucharist

 

 

 

 

 

STB

10:45am

10:45am

10:45am

10:45am

Joint Service.

This service will alternate from St Barnabas, to All Saints, and so on.  The time will be 09:30 if held at All Saints, and 10:45am if held at St Barnabas.

ASK

09:30

09:30

09:30

09:30

 

ASK

Parish Communion

ASK

Family Service

ASK

Choral

Eucharist

ASK

Parish Communion

 

 

 

 

ASK

11am

Please Note that Cafe Church is no longer running from January 2017

  

Description of the services above:

The Parish Eucharist service is a model Eucharistic service.  It has a sermon, and a collection of hymns to enjoy.  It lasts approximately 55mins.

The Family service is a fun-filled time of worship for families of all ages.  Our uniformed organisations (Scouts, Guides etc) usually attend these services also, which very much adds to the richness and depth of this service.  It is a non-Eucharistic service, and as such lasts approximately 45mins.  As with the Elevenses service we often make good use of today's technology (screen and projector, etc).  The music is provided by the choir and the Elevenses band on alternate months.

The Choral Eucharist is a traditional service with a high calibre of choral music.  The music is led by our Choir, and Choir Master Eric Beven. 

The word 'Eucharist' refers to the section in the service when the Priest uses bread and wine to recall the events of the Last Supper.  As you can see from the table above not all of our services include a Eucharist.  The word Eucharist comes from the Greek word εὐχαριστία (eucharistia), meaning 'thanksgiving'.  The terms 'The Lord's Supper', and 'Communion' all refer to the same occasion, although some churches will have a preference for one term for theological reasons, but so as not to get bogged down now it is reasonable to think of each term referring to the same thing.   It is celebrated in accordance with Jesus' instruction at the Last Supper (Matthew Chapter 26), that his followers do this in remembrance of Him, as when he gave his disciples bread, saying, "This is my body", and gave them the cup, saying, "This is my blood".  There has been much debate over the centuries as to the significance of the Eucharist, mainly revolving around the extent to which, and in what ways, Jesus is present in the bread and the wine once the Priest has prayed over it.  This debate comes from the literal sound of Jesus' words as recorded in the Gospels, 'While they were eating, Jesus took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to His disciples, saying, take and eat, this is my body.  Then He took the cup, gave thanks and offered it to them, saying drink from it, all of you.  This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.'  (Matthew 26:26-28).   

Whatever our particular theological understanding may be, it is important to remember that Jesus instructed us to celebrate the Eucharist, and He did so within the context of His crucifixion and its almighty power for all of us.